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What motivates your students? 
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Joined: Fri Nov 10, 2006 3:35 pm
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Location: Yamaguchi, Japan
Post What motivates your students?
I am presenting a talk on motivation and wondered what the situation is like around the world.

Why do your students take English classes?
What do you think is the best motivational tool you use to encourage them to learn?
How do these things change as students age?

If you are able to, ask some students and post what they say.
Is it different to what you think?


Wed Nov 07, 2007 2:57 pm
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Joined: Mon Oct 13, 2008 2:55 pm
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Location: Korea
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From my experience teaching in public schools, most students lack motivation as they are only in class because the have to be.

However, when they are young it is easy to provide them with some motivation by offering some sort of reward for effort.

As the students get older, I find it a little harder to motivate them. Usually what works best is choosing a topic that is VERY interesting to them. In this situation, the motivation comes from a genuine interest in voicing their thoughts and opinions.


Mon Dec 08, 2008 2:55 pm
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Joined: Tue Jan 22, 2008 4:03 pm
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I agree it's a must to find something interesting. I found that by using the schoolbooks the students lost interest very quickly. Now using the different resources available and creating your own lessons can be much more fun. For example countries and nationalities, first thing most boys think about is football so if you ask who is from Brazil they will know Kaka is Brazilian, same girls movie stars and pop singers.

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jurgen


Mon Dec 08, 2008 3:10 pm
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Tell them constantly how well they are doing. Encourage, praise, and express faith in your students. In short, never stop telling them that you believe in them!

Have fun. Have a sense of humor. The students generally enter class the first day scared and expecting the worst. Dispel their fears with laughter. Throw out the old rule of "never smile for the first two weeks." Put your students at ease and the learning environment becomes productive and happy.

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Teach English in Korea


Sun Dec 14, 2008 2:07 pm
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I've realized that the problem in being such a nice teacher in the first classes is that you lose your authority!

I can't be nice and have authority, and I believe this is a problem that some teachers face.

kids are not the same they use to be, they aren't naif and they can be cruel to a teacher....

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Debora Nach


Tue Feb 10, 2009 8:56 pm
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I think motivation is related to appropriate understanding.

The problem is having too much study or a curriculum which does not suit the level of the students. Changing curriculums often take time to implement, but children do not have that luxury and the year(s) are already over before anything is done.

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Moon


Sun Feb 15, 2009 9:11 pm
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Post Motivation
Hi,
I generally use games to motivate my kids, I'll often use a game as the driving force behind a lesson, my games are often not related to the lesson content (although if they are I think that's best). So, I'll have a game running as a motivation for performing certain otherwise boring activities - like reading and practicing grammar. I also use a scoring system that makes everyone in the team responsible for winning. So everyone in the teams performance will affect the eventual outcome.


Tue Jun 09, 2009 7:27 pm
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deborrrah wrote:
I've realized that the problem in being such a nice teacher in the first classes is that you lose your authority!

I can't be nice and have authority, and I believe this is a problem that some teachers face.

kids are not the same they use to be, they aren't naif and they can be cruel to a teacher....


I don't feel that being nice impacts on your authority in any way, you can be both nice and still have expectations on the Ss performance.


Mon Jun 15, 2009 1:28 am
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Joined: Mon Jan 12, 2009 10:27 pm
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Post Hello
I was just passing by and read your post. I must agree that I think you can be friendly and still impose your authority.

In my opinion what I feel motivates my students, is having diversity in the classroom between the four language skills. Doing a little bit of everything aswell as getting them to produce orally in a task based activity is really rewarding for them as they see how their language is being used for an actual purpose.

The learning process in itself is very rewarding. i teach small groups of adults which makes it easier ;)

Happy teaching!

Domi


Wed Jul 08, 2009 8:21 pm
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Hi,

I teach to 8 years old french students. They come to english classes because...they have no choice.

But they really enjoy it because I use a lot of games, and for once they can really act and play inside the classroom.

I think their main motivation is the game, as they don't really see 'even if they know it) the importance of speaking other languages.


Fri Aug 07, 2009 5:27 am
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Joined: Thu Apr 28, 2011 4:20 am
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[quote="andiusaugustus"]
However, when they are young it is easy to provide them with some motivation by offering some sort of reward for effort.

As the students get older, I find it a little harder to motivate them. Usually what works best is choosing a topic that is VERY interesting to them. In this situation, the motivation comes from a genuine interest in voicing their thoughts and opinions.[/quote]

I completely agree with you, same situation here with my students! When they are younger, I somehow manage to satisfy them with an excellence award or a sticker, as they are competitive, it is a challenge to get such a prize. But when they become older, they say things like 'why would I like to get one boring piece of paper, it's not like it's going to get me money or permission to go out'... So it doesn't work with them. And it's very hard to find such an interesting subject or topic every time, even I you found one, it takes so much time to prepare it, develop it, spice it up... :?


Thu Apr 28, 2011 10:56 pm
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Joined: Mon May 23, 2011 7:47 pm
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I know this is a few years late for your speech...but perhaps it will help someone from now..!
Motivation is difficult to measure. On the surface I'd have to say that use of card games in groups motivates my students because it awakens the drive of students to win. This year I also began bringing in a few iPads to my classroom with some games and books on them. As a new technology- students went completely ape. It was difficult to manage them in the first few lessons but once they began to understand the routine of how to use them and what was expected of them the lessons really smoothed out. So I'd say bringing in a combination of creative realia such as colorful cards, really nicely done prints and technology would be the best route to motivate students to want to study.


Mon May 23, 2011 8:08 pm
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Joined: Fri Jan 28, 2011 1:33 am
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My students are best motivated by games :))) There is always a great stir in the class when I say: time for a game!
However, I also noticed that students (not only kids, but teenagers and adults too) are greatly motivated when I tell them stories. There's perfect silence in the class, all students' eyes are on me, their faces change while listening to the story - wow, that's really amazing - I love it :)
Best wishes!

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Tue May 24, 2011 4:48 pm
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Keep the topics being studied relative to the Ss and their needs. As a teacher, i think that being open and honest with the Ss and showing an interest in them, both inside and outside of the classroom, is important.

I always try to put in some kind of activity that i feel the kids will be interested in to try to keep up their motivation and get them interacting with each other.


Mon Jun 13, 2011 3:48 pm
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Joined: Sun May 09, 2010 4:58 pm
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My students are very young so teacher's mood has an impact on them. If you are into the activity (for example: singing a song) they'll join in, if you do it mechanically, they won't follow. Or so it seems to me.
They even feel when you are faking being cheerful, and don't engage as much as they do when you genuinely enjoy it.

People \with more experience than me, what do you think. Am I exaggerating?


Fri Jun 24, 2011 6:49 pm
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