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Using Jenga Blocks 
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Joined: Tue Sep 19, 2006 9:08 am
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Location: Imsil, Jeolla-buk-do, South Korea
Post Using Jenga Blocks
I'm curious who uses Jenga style blocks and what kind of activities are done using them.

With little kids I have the blocks colored six different colors and they roll a die (with the same colors on the faces) to determine which blocks can be removed next. I also have them make a bingo card (5x5) where they color the squares with those six colors (so they can use each color four times--the center square is free). After each block they remove they can cross off one square of the same color on their card. If they seem to knock the tower down too fast then I let them cross off a square after each block regardless to whose turn it was.


Sun Sep 24, 2006 12:37 am
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I have an alphabet die which has all the letters and four wild spots. We also practice the alphabet with Jenga bingo. They make their cards using every letter except one and then I roll the die after each block is removed. If a wild side comes up then they can cross out any letter of their choice. It gives it a nice random element.


Sun Sep 24, 2006 12:42 am
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With older students I like to combine Jenga and Boggle. On a chart, which I don't show the students, I assign a word to each block in the Jenga stack. When a team removes a block I tell them the word and they have to spell it on their team paper. These letters that they collect are the letters that they can use to form other words during the second phase of the game. As soon as a team knocks down the stack I start the countdown on the second phase. During this phase the students form as many words as they can using their letters. The team that knocked down the stack has a few words (determined by the class) deducted as a penalty.


Sun Sep 24, 2006 12:51 am
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Location: Nagano, Japan
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I have the plain wood Jenga blocks. I wrote the letters on one end and numbers on the other with a permanent marker.

For alphabet or phonics practice - you can have them draw letters from a bag and they have to remove one of the blocks with that letter. I use foam letters for them to draw from. The alphabet on the Jenga blocks are all caps so you can also practice upper and lower case reconginition by having them draw lower case. Once they have their letter they tell me what it is, how to read it and a couple words that start with that letter.

A similar activitiy can be done with numbers.

For older students or to practice some grammar structure, I assign the letters or number to a few different target structures.

a-g: simple past statement
h-m: simple past neg. statement
n-u: simple past question
v-z: simple past wh- question

Then they can remove any block of their choice. Once they take the block out they have to make the target sentence. It sounds like the same can be done with the colored blocks. Just assign target structures to the colors.

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Sun Sep 24, 2006 8:02 am
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Joined: Sun Jan 29, 2006 11:14 am
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Location: Nago, Okinawa, Japan
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I have an UNO jenga game and got an idea. I bought a regular Jenga and wrote different commands and questions on each one. Once they pull one out, they must read the block and either answer the question or follow the command.


Sun Sep 24, 2006 9:24 pm
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I have uno jenga and the regular jenga. I haven't had a chance to use uno jenga yet, but the regular one, I have students ask each other questions each time they pull one block. If one student makes the tower fall over they have to ask everyone a question :shock: hehehe makes for some excitement :P


Sun Sep 24, 2006 11:26 pm
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I've never seen Uno Jenga. How is it played? What kind of commands and questions do you put on the blocks? It sounds like a fun idea.


Mon Sep 25, 2006 12:38 am
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Jenga blocks are colored, numbered and symboled like the Uno game. and the game is played the same. It is fun!
Cesar


Mon Sep 25, 2006 1:18 pm
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Recently I was asked to make an activity for a provincial English festival for high school and middle school students. The activity was to be about 10 minutes long and fun. Not always an easy thing to do. There would be about 10-15 students per group every 10 minutes. I decided to combine Jenga and secret messages. The students will be broken up into small groups (maybe three per group). Each group will have a Jenga stack. A card will be shown with a word or phrase with all the vowels removed (there are no spaces where the vowels were, but word boundaries are still there). The first team to say the correct word or phrase is the only team which doesn't need to remove a block. This continues until only one team's stack is standing.


Mon Oct 02, 2006 12:37 am
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Post Jenga game
This game really helps increase levels of fluency, reading and listening.
First put all the jenga blocks into a bag. You then have to prepare question cards which you want your students to practice. Even if the students don't understand the question at the start of the game, they will have mastered it by the end of it.
Anyway, very simply deal out the question cards and give the students a minute to look at the question and ask for help understanding it or reading it if they need to. Teacher then takes the bag of jenga bricks. Choose a student to start the questioning and GO! Teacher starts building a tower and S1 must ask the teacher their question. When the question has been asked, teacher stops building. Teacher answers and starts building again, while S2 asks their question and so on. When everyone has asked their question count up how many bricks are in the tower, write the number on the board, hand the bricks to the next student and start again. Whover has the most bricks in their tower is the champ. You will find the students really try to ask their questions quickly and also help out each other if someone has trouble and is taking a long time to ask. They want the builder's tower to be a low as possible. You don't need to explain anything at the start, just play. Eventually they will be screaming out those questions at bullet speed. Also, I give the builder a 5 second time limit to answer each question or they lose a brick from their tower. A bit of pressure never hurt anyone ;-) They soon start thinking quickly!
Use any questions you want and have fun!


Sat Feb 14, 2009 11:51 am
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Jenga blocks are used as dominoes in my Pre-K class. The end of each block has a handwritten letter on it. The kids line them up in alphabetical order and push them all down when they are done. The same idea can be used for numbers, words, simple sentences, etc.-using multiple Jenga block sets.


Sun Feb 15, 2009 7:41 am
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I used the wooden jenga blocks with a letter stuck on them (on all sides of the block), and the key is to play jenga but also make a word before the block falls.

The letters can be peeled off of course.

I used also sight words (taken from their current text) and ask the students to make any sentence with the word.

I used verbs as words and they must say the past tense and also the present perfect tense of the word. For the more advanced classes, I get them to make a sentence using the correct verb form.

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Sun Feb 15, 2009 8:48 pm
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Wow! These jenga games look awesome! I will definitely start using them for my special ed classes.



Do you guys have any recommendations on using Jenga in large classrooms with 28-36 students? It would be a bit expensive to buy 6 or 8 jenga sets and have them play in groups.

How well does it work if you use half a jenga set?

Or do you guys know any cheap alternatives?


Thu May 28, 2009 10:44 am
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Location: indonesia
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woww.....great game..here is the alternative i use for the aid (jenga block)...i usually use the top bottle of soft drinks....to replace jenga block...it is also fun and cheap!.....i just try to optimalize the minimum resources...happy trying.... :smt023 :smt023

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Thu May 28, 2009 9:44 pm
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