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Drawing games: prepositions of place and much more 
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Joined: Mon Jan 02, 2006 10:46 am
Posts: 2130
Location: Nagano, Japan
Post Drawing games: prepositions of place and much more
1. Group students into teams. (min. 2 people but not more than 4)
2. One student from each team is choosen as the drawer for round one
3. The rest of the students look at a picture (not the drawer.)
4. I take the picture away and the team members go to the drawer and try to explain in as much detail as possible the picture.
5. The drawer listens to the explanation and draws what s/he hears.
I allow the students to do anything they want other than speak Japanese. They can gesture and the drawer can ask questions to varify information. It's best to start with simple pictures first and move up. This really gets them talking. (If you can't draw you can find great pictures in picture dictionaries or children's books.)


A different game:

1. Group students into teams. (min. 2 people but not more than 4)
2. One student from each team is choosen as the drawer for round one
3. I write out and show the drawers a sentence at the front of the class. (A monkey is in the cup.)
4. Drawers race back and draw the picture of a monkey in a cup without speaking or gesturing. The team member can go to the teacher and check the answer once they think they've go it.

That's a little roudy and you can award students or not. they enjoy the game and usually are just happy to play it.

(This can also be done with toys hidden inside a box and have the students look at the scene instead of reading the sentence off of a piece of paper.)



A quiet game: Draw a Park

1. give everyone a piece of paper and start them out with "There is a small pond in the center of the park."
2. Students go around and add to the park. Anything is OK! Try to get them to be as discriptive as possible.
(Don't let them look at others' drawings)
3. In the end compare parks with a few people and see how others perceived the information. Are things in the right place? Did everyone draw the same kind of bench? same kind of flowers, trees, etc.? Were there kids on the swings? How many swings did you draw?

If you have time to play again, students will really try to be clear and descriptive the second or third time around. They want to be understood!

Happy teaching,
Mark

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Fri Jan 27, 2006 7:07 am
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