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Medical ESL 
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MES-Member

Joined: Sat Oct 07, 2006 9:49 pm
Posts: 9
Location: northern japan
Post Medical ESL
in the upcoming year, i will begin teaching a couple new medical classes. however, this will be my first endeaver in teaching medical ESL. hence, i am seeking some advice, hints, tips, et al... the more the better...

thanks,
joe


Fri Dec 29, 2006 2:49 pm
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MES-Zealot!

Joined: Thu Aug 10, 2006 5:14 pm
Posts: 117
Location: Adelaide Australia
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Excuse my ignorance, but by Medical ESL, do you mean you will be teaching ESL to Medical students or teaching ESL students medical terms for going to visit a doctor etc?!?
Anyway, www.englishmed.com looks good.
Also www.hospitalenglish.com has FREE flashcards and materials.
Check them out! And good luck!


Fri Dec 29, 2006 4:22 pm
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MES-Member

Joined: Sat Oct 07, 2006 9:49 pm
Posts: 9
Location: northern japan
Post 
thanks for the reply and the links...

to clarify, "medical ESL" in terms of teaching to doctors and nurses, not necessarily to medical students...

i have a couple books from longman that i am looking over, but i am still searching for more options, possibilities, and ideas for these classes; since, these are my first clients in the medical profession, i am also looking into some "pre-insight" into their "professional linguistic goals".

thanks,
joe


Sat Dec 30, 2006 9:37 am
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Joined: Mon Jan 02, 2006 10:46 am
Posts: 2130
Location: Nagano, Japan
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I teach at a nursing college and actually www.hospitalenglish.com is one of my other sites. The resources are pretty good for doctors or nurses with at least intermediate ability.

I overestimated the ability of the nursing students I teach and as it turns out, I can't use any of those materials with my current classes. Thus, the site remains the same as it was back in March 2006.

Anyway, what I do now is work on simple speech acts starting with
- a patient entering the hospital
- explaining the patient's room
- getting a medical history and patient information
- explaining about the hospital (wards and departments, giving directions)
- explaining a few simple procedures: taking a blood sample, moving a patient, starting an IV.

That's the basic outline for one class that runs 30 hours.

The second year I teach another class for 30 hours. It advances into more complex discussions.

- review the old material
- go over dispensing medication, directions, and patient counseling
- go over some diseases and advice for the patient

The second year was where I thought I was going to use the hospitalenglish.com resources but I tried two of the easiest ones and they bombed because they were too difficult for the majority.

I have some simple resources and games I made for those classes. The school wants me to focus on speaking and making English class more enjoyable, so my lessons aren't too intense.

Take a look at the teacher materials on hospitalenglish.com. The healthcare professional articles are the easiest and you could use those to start you off. If they can get through those, then you can try the disease state directors. Those should be very helpful to both doctors and nurses for talking about diseases and educating patients. That's generally the area they have difficulty with.

I wrote those articles, but if you have success with them you could search out more articles and do something similar.

The first question I would ask is do they want to learn English to talk with patients or to talk with other healthcare professionals. Those are two totally different courses.

_________________
Build up! Be positive! Teach hard!


Sat Dec 30, 2006 11:57 am
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MES-Member

Joined: Sat Oct 07, 2006 9:49 pm
Posts: 9
Location: northern japan
Post 
thanks for the response...

from the sounds of it, you are teaching the medical classes to large-sized classes, correct?

i see what you are saying about the focus of the class-- to be directed toward communicating with other professionals or to patients...

overall, how did you find the doctors' overall english ability and background?

also, on a different note/topic... what are your thoughts on philipino/thai nurses coming to work in japan in relation to the teaching english sector?

thanks,
joe


Sun Jan 07, 2007 5:53 pm
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MES-Zealot!

Joined: Fri Nov 10, 2006 3:35 pm
Posts: 119
Location: Yamaguchi, Japan
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My son (12 years and beginner Japanese) has just had his appendix removed in a Japanese hospital, first day home today. We are out in the countryside and so it was not a big city hospital . I had the pleasure (?) of staying with him for the five days he was in hospital. The biggest piece of advice I can offer here is to teach Child English. One doctor, the aneathetist (sp?) could speak a good level of English. It was great that everyone else had a go at some and would translate on the computer or from a book but unfortunately my son didn`t understand the words used. Things like defecate, stool (he thought chair when asked "do you do stool" and had no idea), "do you have gas" (he thought they wanted to give him laughing gas, which he has had before for injuries but he wasn`t in pain) etc. I translated into kid English: poos, wees, fart etc. The simpler the term the better. It is also important to stress that things may need to be said a few times for understanding to take place. The nurses would ask other patients in Japanese a few times but if one go in English didn`t work they tended to not try again. Luckily for me this is not my first encounter with a hospital both here and at home and so I knew what to expect which made understanding easier.
It would have been good to have had some forms in English, these may exist in other areas, but haven`t been in either hospital I have experienced in Japan.


Wed Jan 24, 2007 12:05 pm
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MES-Member

Joined: Sat Oct 07, 2006 9:49 pm
Posts: 9
Location: northern japan
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simon, thanks for the reply.

you are absolutely right!

i took my infant son the other day to the eye clinic. both the doctor and her husband speak relatively good english. however, they needed the aide of my wife to translate due to the technical jargon. but, my wife doesnt know the technical medical names as well. she just drew a diagram of the eye and briefly explained the situation.

although doctors generally have a good command of english and are able to communicate to a certain degree, they seem to bypass the opportunity to communicate due to not knowing the technical words...

thanks...

joe


Thu Feb 01, 2007 10:11 am
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Thanks everyone, very informative. I just started a private with a doctor and was looking for supplemental class activities. Cheers!


Fri Jan 25, 2008 3:35 am
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